Slovenia Part 1:. The West and Lubljana

I remember distinctly when we crossed the border into Slovenia for the first time. We were on a dirt road cutting through a corn field and figured it out when the road signs were no longer in Italian. I also remember not realizing we passed back and forth between Italy and Slovenia three times until we looked at the map later. Our worries about an immigration checkpoint were unecessary.

We first read about Slovenia (and honestly discovered that it existed) a few years ago in an issue of Adventure Cycling magazine. I remember dreaming about the possibility of spending two weeks exploring another country on a bicycle and how impossible that sounded. Now here we were, over a month into a three month trip and finally crossing into the unfamiliar land we longed to see for so long.

We started the route by joining a published bikepacking route that Cass Gilbert, one of my favorite bikepacking bloggers created. We rode up steep hills and passed mountain vinyards with spectacular views. The excitement of finally getting into the backwoods and mountains and doing some real off-road bikepacking was exhilerating. We stuck with Cass’ route for a few days then eventually branched off and got back onto our own track. It never fails that when we try to follow someone else’s published route, we end up miserable becuase we’ve got our own style and no one else seems to plan the way we do. The route was great, but included a lot of unnecessary climbs.  That is fine if you are on a loop for a few days trying to maximize scenic views and exercise, we however were trying to get somewhere.  I’m writing this in Slovakia and at this point as a grizzled veteran of this trip, I barely plan a day ahead most of the time because our mood that day and seeing the actual mountains in person instead of on a map determines where we go a lot of the time. I’ll get around to writing a “Plan on the go” guide someday but for now, back to Slovenia.

As I said, we knew next to nothing about this country with such a rich heritage. It didn’t even exist until 1991 when Yugoslavia broke up and I got the sense they were still carving out their identity. Initally, the Western mountains felt a lot like Italy. There were vinyards everywhere and the architecture looked very similar. It was so interesting riding a bicycle and every day noticing the subtle changes in everything from the houses to the way roads were maintained and built. We stopped at a few landmarks, there was a WWI monument that turned out to be in Italy and we didn’t know until we read some plaques in Italian. It was sobering to see all the names of soldiers who died on the walls and think of all the lives impacted.

We had a helluva climb up to a church and cemetary on top of a mountain which drained us both physically. We celebrated our victory with boiled potatoes and a zooming downhill ride afterwards. Our legs and lungs certainly took a beating after the flat farmlands that is Northern Italy. The mountains kicked our asses! Our average distance was cut by two thirds and my arthritis in my knees started rearing its ugly head. This sent me down the rabbit hole (Remember I was reading Alice in Wonderland?) of saddle adjustments which is about as fun as trying to get a piece of popcorn out of your teeth with no toothpick.

The scenery was gorgeous and we gradually got our mountain legs up to snuff. We met so many lovely friendly people and enjoyed camping in the forest again. Our path took us East until we finally hit the Capital city of Lubjliana. As far as cities go, this one was like hitting the easy button!  We rolled into the outskirts following farm roads and Lauren took the chance to befriend some four legged comrads.  

Once we neared the metro area there was an endless bikelane. It eventually turned into an intricate system of bike highways that sprawled all over the city like arteries and veins. Every car was aware of and followed the right of way rules with bikes. It was brilliant!

Yep, a vending machine for bike tubes!

We had a few maintenance issues with the bikes so we tried to find a shop to remedy them and also kept up our tradition of drinking the local brews. In this case that meant Lasko, a beer named for the town it was made in, but more on that later. 

 To make a long story longer, we ended up staying in the center of the city because the campground wanted 37 Euros a night to tent cap.  I wanted to say, “Lady, you realize we are in a tent right? All we need is 10 square feet of grass and a cold shower.”  Instead I said I was going to go check with my wife, then we rode back into the city.  For nearly the same price we found a nice hostel in the center of the city.  The next few days were grand.  There were burgers, beers, chinese food, and me performing noisy bike maintenence in the basement of the hostel much to the chagrin of the counterperson who no one told I was down there. 

During our celebration of my 1 year anniversary of leaving the Air Force, we were startled by an impromptu firewords celebration coming from the castle just for me. I didn’t remember sending the email to the chamber of commerce but was glad they remembered. Obviously we celebrated with drinks and great food.

Yes, I was that idiot taking pictures of fireworks.

That evening we coordinated to meet with the crazy Scotsman Graeme that we met in Italy and we ended up shutting down several pubs with his Slovenian friend.  We sampled local beers and viljamovka (pear brandy) and learned a bit more Slovenian from his friend and our waitress.  We found out later that Graeme got lost on the way home when his phone battery died and rode about aimlessly unitl 4:30 AM until he found his camping spot.  I’m sure the viljamovka had nothing to do with it.

After a prolonged wandering session looking for a reputable bike shop, I got my cassette fixed and we headed East the next day to find more mountains. On the way out of the city, we climbed the hill to check out the castle and were not diappointed. Lubjliana was without a doubt, the best city we had seen. We both remarked about how we would love to live there sometime and try out “city life”. There was just the right amount of modern city with history and culture. The locals were friendly and the food was amazing. It is absolutely a place you must visit if you come to Europe and want to get off the beaten path. Lubjliana is a truly magical place.

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Gondola rides and old friends

As I sit here in the woods somewhere in Hungary trying to remember what happened in Italy, it feels like a year ago even though it’s been maybe a month. We’ve been seeing and doing so much that I haven’t had the time to write. I guess that is a good thing, we have been so busy living that I don’t have the time to document it… What a problem to have.

Riding through Northern Italy became somewhat of a routine and did not offer a lot of opporunities for true bikepacking. We rode dirt roads and we camped when we could, but usually it was just cutting through farms and setting up a tent in an acre of trees, then leaving early in the morning before anyone knew we were there. It was a lot of cornfields and we joked that it felt surprisingly a lot like Kansas. We remembered how excited Lauren was when we saw the first cornfield in Italy as we rode out of the mountains, little did we know we’d have a solid two weeks of nothing but them.

We eventually made it to the coast of the Adriatic. As we rolled into the outskirts of a small coastal town called Chioggia, we were exhausted and still had a few kilometers to the coast. We needed calories and did the unthinkable. We ate McDonalds! It was delicious until literally the last bite, then we both immediately regretted it. We got our calories though and struggled on to the hotel with burps of regret all the way there. The town was nice enough, it was the kind of small beach town where the locals went for the weekend.  It reminded me of the Jersey shore a little bit. I’m talking about the place of course and not that awful TV show! We spent a rest day there then caught the ferry to the chain of small islands that led North to Venice. We leap-frogged ferrys and riding until we got to Lido then as we were purchasing our tickets for the ferry to Venice we found out that bicycles are not allowed in Venice… AT ALL! My frustration and disbelief did not amuse the ticket lady, so we set off to figure out a plan B. We tried leaving the bikes at a bike shop in Lido but none of the shop owners were having it. We considered wild camping in the forest or stashing the bikes in the woods but they are not cheap bicycles and our whole lives are strapped to them. Eventually we settled on a little campground North of town and decided to just do a day trip to Venice.  What a day it was!

We arrived in the morning and after spending 30 minutes looking for a bathroom that didn’t cost money to use, we inadvertantly found ourselves exactly where we were trying to get. St. Barnabus Cathedral is a small relatively unremarkable church as far as Venice goes, but it also happens to be the site that acted as the Library from Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. You know the scene where he smashes a hole in the floor while the librarian is stamping books?  It was the only thing I wanted to see in Venice.

We sat down and had a prosecco in the square out front. We considered going to see some other sights but instead the glass turned into a bottle. Then we figured, “Well this place is really nice so maybe we should just have another bottle since they’ll be serving lunch in 30 minutes.” It was a lovely morning.

We eventually got off our asses and onto our not so stable legs and decided to wander a bit. We crossed bridges, went down alleys and explored Venice aimlessly. We decided to stay away from the big attractions and never regretted our decision for a minute. Everyone told us how busy Venice was with all the tourists, but we learned a valuable lesson. Stay away from the big ticket attractions and you can have a nice quiet afternoon in any city.

We debated on the gondola ride for most of the day, especially considering the ridiculous 80 Euro price tag. However the prosecco and the charming gondoleer convinced us. Also, there is no way I’m going to be in Venice with my beautiful wife and not take her on a gondola ride, price be damned! We were happy we did, as we popped the cork on the third bottle we were serenaded and treated to a quiet romantic cruise down the canals that were built so long ago. It sounds corny, but it was incredibly romantic and we were so happy we went.

As we arrived back at the dock it was nearing dinner time so we did what you do in Venice. We ate Ethiopian food! It was delicious to say the least and we had our last wine of the eveneing. Afterwards, we caught the ferry back to our island campground and slept soundly with a new destination in the morning, Aviano Air Force Base.

The base was definately out of the way but the few days we spent there were absolutely worth it. As we left Venice we were greeted with more cornfields for about half a day then the vineyards started again. With mountains on the horizon and a meeting with some old friends to look forward to, we were ready to ride.  The first afternoon, we were cruising along a country road and passed a driveway next to a vineyard with two bicycles that were made into signs. We saw “restaurant” and “winery” so we turned in. At first it was a little weird, we couldn’t tell who the employees were and who were customers. Eventually a woman came up to us and we asked for menus. She said she didn’t have menus but she’d bring us food and wine. We had one of the best bottles of wine either of us had ever had and were treated to a four course meal. There was fresh tomatoes and mozerella, pasta, a ribeye steak and a myriad of other tasters that were all phenomenal. Our lunch stop turned into a two hour smorgasboard and we indulged in every aspect of it. When we left we commented to the proprietor how much we loved the wine and left with three bottles strapped to our handlebars! It was an afternoon to remember. 

We had some phenomenal lodging that evening that turned into two nights because Lauren had a bad wheel bearing and a hub that was destroyed. Romano at the Bike Air in Pordenone was awesome, he actually machined a new axel at his house on a lathe and refitted new bearings in less than 12 hours. We ate pizza delivery for every meal because that’s all there was and we relaxed and enjoyed a nice cozy bed for 2 days.

After departing in the morning, we kept on a Northerly heading and camped out in the forest near the town where our friends Danny and Betsy live. We had our first campfire of the trip and revelled in the primal glory of staring at a fire in the woods with your best friend at your side. 

The next day we went to their house and had an amazing weekend full of laughs, drinks, and fond memories from our old squadron in the Air Force. They took us to all the local shops in Polcenego and we even hit up the farmer’s market. It was really refreshing to see them fully embrace the Italian lifestyle for their assignment. Betsy helped us out by driving us into town (in a car!!!) so we could get some supplies from a sporting goods store. On the way we stopped at the end of the runway and got to watch several Vipers (F-16s) that we thought were Danny takeoff right over our heads. It was an awesome experience and although I miss flying jets, I’m not sure I would change anything if I could. There are definately aspects of my previous life that I miss… Mostly the flying, and comraderie but this new gig suits me much better.

We met up with a few other friends from our old squadron, Brent and Leah and there little guy. The six and a half of us went to dinner, rode into the mountains for a hike and had an incredible weekend that we will never forget. There was homemade gin from the bar across the street, and a festival in the villiage complete with performers hanging from harnesses and dancing on the side of a building! We had gelato and espresso and lived it up in Polcenego. Our hosts were incredible and we can’t thank them enough. By the way we did all this while Betsy was 8 months pregnant! What a trooper.

Unfortunately we had to get back ont the road, so we said our goodbyes on Sunday morning and started towards what would end up being a true bikepacking adventure.

Italy: Friends in unexpected places

As I sit here on my second beer that I literaly ordered by saying “Una Birra per favore” (I have no clue what kind it is) I am reminded of why we are on this trip…  Not just this trip, but why we are living this life.  There are two old Italian gentlemen trying to catch quick stares at me when I’m not looking wondering why the hell this American guy with long hair and a crazy looking bicycle is doing his laundry and drinking beer in their town.  To be honest, I had to look at google to see what the name of the town is.  It’s called Ostiglia, a place that wouldn’t be marked on any map you might find at the tourist bureau or on lonely planet.  These are the places we love the most and we only find them because we are on bicycles.  They are genuine towns with real people who are not dependent on tourists to make a living.  

We’re staying at one of two hotels in town and the short ride I took to find the laundromat led me down gorgeous cobblestone streets and buildings that pre-date anything you might find in North America by several centuries.  I tried google maps to find the laundromat but it failed miserably so I had to do it the old fashioned way.  I stopped in a shop and asked for directions.  The shopkeeper gave me directions in Italian which I tried to follow then said “Via Italia” (Italy street) and I was on my way.  It took me 20 minutes to find it as I rode in circles but I made it eventually.

I’m flying solo today, as Lauren is sick in the hotel room.  I’m out running errands, doing laundry and of course drinking beer.  It’s been close to a month on the road and it is setting in that this is a very different lifestyle from bumming around on a tropical island in Thailand scuba diving and partying all the time.  It is certainly more stressful day to day.  However, the problems we deal with on a daily basis are so basic it is almost primal.  Where are we going to sleep?  Where are we going to find food for the day?  Where are we heading next?  The last question is my favorite to answer.  I’ve stopped planning the route more than a day ahead becuase we are always hearing about a new awesome place that we should check out on the way and there is no reason not to.  The unexpected detours are what lead to the best stories.  

The first day in Italy started off as a standard day of bicycle travel.  The train we took out of Switzerland (We told ourselves we took the train less because of the alps and more because of our budget) was out of service for the last several stops.  We planned to arrive in Domodossola but instead were dropped off in some random town in the Alps across the border.  They were bussing people to the final stop but the Italian Customs agents suggested that we just ride our bikes.  We came to that conclusion on our own a few minutes prior when we saw how packed the busses were.  I can only imagine the reception we would have received loading our giant fully loaded bikes onto a bus full of people who had been on a train all day.  

We began riding towards Domodossola and after a harrowing experince in a high speed tunnel that ended with a U turn we ended up there eventually.  We stayed at a charming little hotel in town and started off the next morning.  Our first Italian meal was of course pizza.  After ordering, I sat in the shop wondering if the cook was actually making my pizza or just ignoring me.  Twenty minutes later he motioned for me to come to the counter, presented two gargantuan pizzas and smiled as he offered me two free beers.  We were off to a good start.

We had a destination of “maybe Venice” along with a planned stop in a random town I’d decided to send myself a package to.  Besides that, we had little in the way of plans.  The first few days were like something out of a storybook.  We passed through tiny hamlets with cobblestone streets and people sitting outdoors in patio furniture in the town square.  More than once we remarked to each other that this is exactly like you see Italy in the movies. We passed gorgeous mountain lakes and mixed in a bit of singletrack on our way as we randomly rode from town to town.  One afternoon we found ourselves leaving a castle and picking up a dirt doubletrack road where I wouldn’t have been surprised to run into Arya Stark and The Hound on horseback.  

There was a little cross on the Open Source map and we decided that a church in the middle of the forest would be a nice place for lunch.  Several wrong turns and a few hours later, we made it and it was worth every pedal stroke.  On the way we took a detour through a vineyard and ended up at San Michele.  It was a ruined church first built in the tenth century, but a site that had been used as highground since the Bronze Age!  It was a shame not to camp there, but our arrival was too early to stop for the day so we ate a picnic lunch and pressed on.  That evening we camped at a campground and watched the latest Star Wars movie at a theatre in Italian with no subtitles I think it was good?

We wild camped and stopped at campgrounds on the way until we hit a crossroads decision point…  To go to Milan or not to go to Milan?  We debated for a while and eventually decided to leave it up to fate.  We sent out a few warmshowers requests and got a reply from a longshot.  We camped in the woods that night and headed into the city the next day to meet our host.  Before this day, all I knew of Milan was that it was usually included with New York and Paris when discussing places that high fashion was important.  (Not exactly Evan and Lauren’s fortè)

We rolled into town and ate an awesome lunch at a restaurant which proved to be exactly what we wanted.  The proprietor was so proud to show off his food and hospitality to a couple foreigners.  We practiced our Italian and learned a new phrase or two as we enjoyed a simple lunch of fresh roast beef, bread, and delicious pasta which we justified because we are technically working out for 8-10 hours a day.  Next we killed some time by searching for a bookstore to trade in our spent supply for a little Keroac and Alice in Wonderland because, why not?  After that was a bike shop/bar where we had a beer that turned into three because of a rain shower.  We sampled local brews and answered questions about our bizarre bikes and our adventures.  It was a lovely afternoon.  

When the rain stopped we headed towards a spot on the map where all the currency exhcanges seemed to be concentrated.  As we rounded a corner we were hit right in the face with the most spectacular Cathedral either of us had ever seen in our lives.  We had hit the city center without realizing it.  In the eye of the storm in Milan we were surrounded by tourists and scammers.  A quiet square with patio furniture this was not…  We grabbed a few photos then got the fuck out of there as soon as we could!

We decided to head to the East side of town towards our host’s place to be a bit closer as we waited for him to get off work.  We waited at… wait for it… a bar!  We sampled some local craft brews which were quite good then rode a few blocks to meet Michele, a stranger who would soon become a friend.

We planned to do a bit of laundry, get a shower, enjoy a nice dinner and then be on the way in the morning.  Instead we stayed for three days!  Michele was a phenomenal host, he took time to get to know us and made us feel at home.  On the second night, he invited us to “Critical Mass”.  Something we had never heard of, but will never miss the opportunity to attend again.  It goes something like this.  Gather as many cyclists, and other crazy folks on weird human powerd vehicles as possible, meet at a predetermined location, then proceed to ride through the city at night blocking traffic, making noise and having as much fun as possible…  All with the ultimate goal of raising awareness for cyclists in the city.  We shared beers and smokes with our host and his friend Angelo as we rode along with a crowd of a few hundred other people on bikes for two hours.  Aside from chasing the clouds in a jet, this was the closest I’ve ever come to heaven!  There was a crazy man on roller skates blocking traffic and shouting at drivers explaining the situation to the upset folks we stopped and thanking the kind ones.  Also we had a fantastic lunatic on a giant adult sizes bigwheel powersliding around roundabouts, and endless bicycle bell ringing everytime someone had the audacity to honk at us.  We even saw a man on a skateboard skating in a crowd of people and rolling a joint at the same time, it was truly impressive.  It lasted for hours and by the end of it my face hurt from smiling so much.  If you live near a major city and have an old bike in the garage, do yourself a favor, check facebook to see if your town has “Critical Mass”, pump up your tires and go.  It was truly one of the greatest nights of my entire life!

Afterwards, we hit up a local craft brew pub where I was ecstatic to find Stone IPA on tap for one last brew before we headed home.  The next day, Michele showed us around a bit more as we looked at cache barns from the middle ages, watched bicycles on TV and generally had a beautiful effortless time.  In the morning Lauren cooked a proper Southern American breakfast including biscuits and gravy which we all loved.  We said our goodbyes and headed off like Willy on the road again.  

The next stop was a random bit of serendipitous chance.  While in Switzerland, I finally got around to ordering a replacement for my phone case which I ruined by swimming in pools and the ocean all day during the Songkran festival for the Thai New Year.  

We left Milan and passed through so many remarkable small towns on the way that you could spend a month in each getting to know the story of the people living there and the history.  Instead, we usually grabbed some food and a beer and were on our way.  I had the package sent to a random reasonably sized town that was along our route and that is what brought us to Cremona.  As we rolled into town, we commented on how the tower was pretty big, not knowing it was the largest brick bell tower in Europe.  We had a bit of a rest in the central square in front of the beautiful cathedral and sipped prosecco and ate paninis at a cafe.  Once our bellys were full and spirits lifted we headed off towards a campground on the south side of town.  We set up shop and then were delighted as cyclist after cyclist came in after us.  At the end of the day, there were 12 bicycle travellers who camped at the spot we chose at random.  We met a few of them and good times ensued.

There was the Swiss couple who gave us tons of suggestions of places to explore and new cycling apps we should try.  Then there was Graeme, the wild Scottsman who we ended up spending a few days with us exploring the city.  He had an interesting story and the most insane touring bike setup I’ve seen.  He must have had 100 lbs. of gear including a full Scottish formal kilt regalia piled up on the back of a carbon framed fatbike with bungee cords and rope everywhere.  It’s always interesting to compare and contrast how people can be doing the same activity and do it so differently.  It is kind of fun that bike touring is still in it’s corporate infancy and has not been standardized in any way.  We see recumbant bikes, panniers, bike packers, jerry rigged thrift shop bikes and everything in between.  We hung with Graeme and chatted over beers, and wine which turned into a wild midnight ride in sandals through a field of 3 ft. tall weeds into the town square where the ominous cathedral reigned supreme.  

We stood there in the square on our bikes and discussed our theories about it’s origins at length.  The grandiose Milan speciman this was not. It was clear that it was built and rebuilt several times and you could actually see the different ages of humanity in the construction.  There were pre-christian influences at the bottom, bricks of all different colors and you could actually see where the renaissance happened in the construciton!  The next day we met David who was Graeme’s waiter the night before and he took us inside where the art and craftsmanship was even more spectacular.  Also while waiting out a rainstorm at a cafe we met Derek from Liverpool who happened to be at the same spot on his tour of Italy.  We made a ragtag group and stuck together for the rest of the evening.  Maybe it’s the fact that everyone is traveling alone and longs for company, but I like to think that this hobby and/or lifestyle attracts a certain kind of person and it is easy to get along with folks who think the same as you…

We planned to leave the next day but my package was late and Lauren needed a dentist so we stayed one more day and meet up with David again and met his lovely girlfriend.  We shared a cup of wine sitting on the ground near our tent and felt like the hosts for once, albeit our furniture was made of good old fashioned terra firma and we had no roof.  

This lifestyle is wonderful, but it weighs heavy on the heart.  In the year since we said goodbye to our former existence, we’ve met some of the most extraordinary people you could ever hope to encounter.  Our circle of friends we had in Tucson was so hard to say goodbye to.  They were the first group of folks since leaving our families and childhood friends that we felt a connection with that can’t really be described.  Then on Koh Tao we formed relationships in a few months that felt like they had been forged a lifetime ago.  Now, on the road we continue to meet these incredibly amazing people who change our lives and have such an impact in such a short amount of time.  It is a catch 22 though.  You can’t expose yourself to enough likeminded people if you don’t travel, but you meet them when traveling so you can’t settle down to have them in your life permanently.  It’s almost like you go through the full friendship in a matter of days and come out the other side wondering how the hell you are going to go on without these amazing new people in your life.  I have a habit of always trying to find solutions to problems, but I don’t think this one is really a problem.  It’s just the way it is.  We’ve got a growing list of friends all over the world.  With a quick message, we’ve got a local contact and if they are not around, they can hook us up with the right kind of people.  If we ever decide to slow down for awhile, (unlikely) they’ve got the same!

 In the meantime, we’re going to continue this adventure and embrace every new place and experience because after all, being happy is the only thing that matters, and if you are not happy, is your own damn fault!

Swiss Family Reunion

“I want to see mountains again Gandalf, mountains!”

-Bilbo Baggins

If there is a polar opposite country to Thailand, it might just be Switzerland. Our first 5 minutes on the streets of Zurich were culture shock to say the least. It was best exemplified when we tried to cross the street the first time. We stood at a crosswalk on a relatively calm street when a Mercedes came speeding our way. We patiently waited for it to pass and were taken aback when the car abruptly stopped and waited for us to cross the crosswalk. Coming from nearly 6 months in Thailand, where crossing the street is up there on the danger meter with skydiving or the luge, we realized we were no longer in the land with no rules.

It might seem a bit strange that we decided to leave Thailand after the last post, as we were so happy. The circumstances for this trip were special though. Lauren’s family had planned a trip to Switzerland for vacation for their first trip outside the US. We agreed to meet them and decided since we were flying that far, we might as well get our plane ticket’s worth and stay in Europe for a few months.

We left Koh Tao kicking and screaming albeit excited to see family.  We had a wonderful sendoff and are looking forward to going back to the island in the fall. The turnout at Goodtime for our impromptu going away sunset was humbling as all of our friends gathered to send us off. We grabbed some dinner and then hit up the Beer Mason’s for some craft brews with those still standing. We said our goodbyes and woke up the next day to catch our ferry to Koh Samui.

Koh Tao means “Turtle Island” and describes not just the sea life, but also the pace of life for the people on land. After being used to this slow pace of a 13 sq. km island for so long, Koh Samui traffic was a circus! We rode the bikes from the pier to the hotel near the airport and then the scavenger hunt began. The packing tape had been no problem, but three bicycle sized cardboard boxes and bubble wrap were not easy things to track down at 3:30 on a Friday afternoon in Koh Samui! We rented a scooter and spent two days rounding up the necessary supplies. The island itself was a tourist trap to say the least so we were not sad to leave. We had trouble at the airport terminal when Lauren’s name was paged and we had to hitch a ride to the baggage terminal because you can not fly with power bank batteries in your checked luggage. We politely fished them out of our bags. As I plucked the third one out, I caught a glimpse of our fuel canister which most definitely was still at least half full of gasoline. It made it through security with no problem!

The flight to Bangkok was pleasant with fish and rice for breakfast on the plane. We transferred to Swiss air in Bangkok and had a lovely flight to Zurich. We finally watched “The Last Jedi”, relaxed and slept. As we flew over a part of the world full of so much turmoil, I couldn’t help but think about how good it felt to be on our way to see family and explore this amazing planet some more.

Which brings us back to Zurich. We landed and took a 30 minute cab from the airport to our hotel for the cost of 3 days living expenses in Thailand. Lauren cooked a delicious pork chop dinner, we assembled the bikes and set off on our journey into the alps. The first day was gorgeous. We got out of town and into the hills and were treated to beautiful deciduous trees, lovely weather and secluded roads. We pulled off on a path and set up our tent for a great night’s sleep.

Seriously… WTF?

The next day we awoke to freezing cold rain and snails everywhere along with the realization that we were not prepared for May in Switzerland. We literally had no pants! We froze our asses off the next day wet and cold and had a challenging day of constant climbs with little respite. At the end of the day, we were exhausted and had to resort to getting a hotel despite it being way out of our budget because we were soaked to the bone.

The next day we found a thrift store, bought some pants and more appropriate cold weather gear and continued on our way. Unfortunately the weather didn’t improve much for the next week and a half, but we made the best of it.

Switzerland is without a doubt one of the most beautiful places in the world. The scenery is spectacular. After the second day, we literally ran out of adjectives to describe our surroundings. Also, it is one of the most bicycle friendly places we’ve ever seen. Everyone rides bicycles so the tiny cars are very courteous to cyclists.

As we progressed, I kept joking that Switzerland was the land of rules… and for some unknown reason, everyone there actually follows them… All of them! One of my big issues in the military was having to follow rules that I deemed stupid so this obviously presented a slight problem for me. I coped with little rebellions like jumping curbs and blasting through roundabouts the wrong way when no one was around just to make myself feel better. I was constantly humming “Signs” by Tesla because there were signs everywhere telling you what to do. Fortunately or unfortunately we couldn’t read them. Also, the people didn’t seem quite as welcoming to visitors as we had hoped. We ran into more than a few servers who scoffed when they found out we didn’t speak Swiss German. We learned basic phrases but it was not enough to please some people. 

Some signs made us happy!

On the other hand, we met some fabulous individuals who showed us so much kindness it offset the bad apples. One afternoon we were fumbling around a village trying to find some information about a yodeling concert that was supposed to be that night. We got a lot of weird looks until a nice young man yelled across the road and asked if we needed help. He and his friends invited us to have a beer with them in the yard and we chatted about our trip and their lives in Switzerland. It was funny to hear them mildly complaining about their government in a seemingly perfect country with no litter, where everyone dives either a bicycle or a brand new car.  We thanked them for their hospitality and ended up skipping the yodeling concert because the crowd was dressed in suits and ties. We pressed on and found camping for the night at the nicest (and most expensive) campgrounds we had ever seen.

Things continued this way as we made our way south towards Murren. At one point, my poor route planning left us on a trail we thought was for bikes but it ended up being a challenging hiking path. It turned out to be a pilgrimage path with stations of the cross every few hundred meters. The terrain was steep and at one point as Lauren was struggling to lift her bike up onto a ledge on the path, a kind old woman in her 70’s appeared out of nowhere and started giving her a push. It was a hilarious scene and we laughed as we thanked her profusely in broken German. A few minutes later the path turned rough again and another even older gentleman came by and did the same. Towards the top of the path, we found a ledger for those making the pilgrimage and signed our names with pride.

We made it over pass after pass and continued on, subsiding on Baguette, Salami, Rugen Brau beer and swiss mountain cheese. If it hasn’t become apparent yet, Switzerland is really expensive and our budget was stretched pretty thin.

How much you wanna make a bet i can throw a football over them mountains?
Never did see the bird, but apparently this is good luck.

We finally arrived in Interlaken which is a beautiful city placed between two gorgeous lakes… Get it? Interlaken? They also had the only other incline train I’d ever seen outside of Pittsburgh. We were lucky enough to have a response on warmshowers and our host Matthius was very kind. We waited for him in the park drinking wine and watching paragliders landing. He met us at a cycling cafe after work and rode with us to his village a few miles away. We were treated to a much needed shower and some lovely meats and cheeses. The later of which was from his family’s cow! We shared stories of traveling and looked at maps of the world together talking about the places we’ve lived, visited and wanted to see. At the end of the night, he brought out a book with his villiage’s history dating back to the middle ages. It was complete with family sigils and drawings of the old farming methods used in the mountains. He explained his families sigil to us and pointed out that the star in the corner meant that someone in the family had been a knight. He said the remnants of the castle on the nearby hill were still standing. It was an amazing evening and reinforced that the best part of traveling is interacting with the local people. We forgot to get a picture together but we did get a few in his awesome hundred year old house.

Somehow we always manage to match…  Nerds!

We left Interlaken and still had a day to kill before Lauren’s family arrived in Murren. We rode through a beautiful valley to Lauderbrunnen where we froze huddled under a bike parking area outside of a convenience store for a few hours. We debated riding up the mountain in the sleet but instead stopped at a bar which happened to have a hotel upstairs. The next day, we elected to take a cable car instead of climbing the mountain in the freezing rain. We arrived in Murren and while it was incredibly touristy, we enjoyed riding through the streets on our way towards our lovely camping spot. We set up shop in a shack on the side of the road and slept soundly although a bit cold. The next day, we killed time drinking beer and wine on a bench and playing gin rummy waiting for her family’s train to arrive. When they did, we upgraded from a pathside shack with three walls to a beautiful Swiss Chalet for 7 days. It was a welcome change to have hot water and warm food.

Saw a sticker from Catalina brewing in Tucson

We spent the week with Lauren’s family checking out the local tourist attractions and playing Settlers of Catan and other board games at night. I tried going mountain biking one afternoon, but the trail was downhill Redbull style so I ended up walking down most of it. We ate well and had good company although the time was too short. Before we knew it, they were off on their way back to America and we were heading south for Warmer Climes and all the Wines in Italy!